Good Old University of Delhi



The  first  time  I  met  Priya,  it  was  on  the  parapet  of  the  first  floor  of  the  Arts  Faculty  building.  It’s  always  roomy  and  airy  and  warm  in  Art’s  Faculty,  the  sunrays  always  lighting  up  the  corridors  full  on  the  face.  I  approached  her  with  a  smile  and  said,  “Hi”.  And  she  smiled  and  replied  Hi  to  me.  And  there  was  a  slight  odd  moment,  and  she  said,  “So  would  you  like  to  sit  down?”  And  I  said,  “Yes,  I  would  like  to.  I  don’t  feel  like  attending  class  now.”  And  thus  we  began  talking.  I  told  her  that  I  was  from  Assam  when  she  asked  me  from  where  in  Northeast  I  came  from.  She  was  from  UP,  her  home  was  a  six-hour  ride  from  Delhi  by  train,  but  had  grown  up  at  different  places  because  her  father’s  job  took  her  all  over  the  country.  She  had  large  eyes  and  curly  hair,  and  there  was  something  truly  genuine,  upright  and  wholehearted  about  her.  We  talked  about  the  novels  we  liked  and  how  time  was  flying  by,  with  second-year  almost  gone  and  still  hardly  knowing  a  quarter  of  the  people  in  class.  That  is  true,  I  told  her,  every  day  we  get  to  see  new  faces.  So  do  you  like  being  here  in  DU?,  I  asked  her.  Yeah,  it’s  nice  but  I  wish  there  was  more  room  for  interaction  between  the  professors  and  the  students.  There  are  just  too  many  students,  and  we  hardly  get  to  know  each  other  in  this  crowd.  Me,  I  kind  of  like  it,  I  told  her,  I  always  wanted  classrooms  packed  with  hundreds  of  students.  For  me,  the  more  the  merrier.  “Have  you  made  lots  of  friends  here?,”  she  asked.  “Yes,”  I  said,  “But  one  day  we  are  quite  close  and  the  next  day  she  has  disappeared  and  I  am  close  with  somebody  else  and  then  she  appears  again  and  then  we  say  hello  how  are  you  or  not  talk  at  all.  It’s  just  that  with  the  amount  of  novels  and  poetry  to  read  and  the  amount  of  material  to  study,  it’s  just  is  not  possible  to  devote  time  for  friendship.”  Yeah,  she  said  pensively.  “What  about  you?”  I  asked  her,  “You  got  lots  of  friends?”  “No,  not  much,”  she  said,  “I  have  a  few  still  from  Miranda  House,  I  have  Advatta  for  instance.  Do  you  know  Advatta?”  “Oh  yes,  I  do.  She’s  quite  a  girl.  We  had  Philosophy  class  together  for  our  optional.”  (And  that’s  how  Priya  became  a  god-sent  guardian  angel  for  me!)  She  was  best  friends  with  Advatta  whom  I  had  feelings  for.  “Do  you  have  a  boy  friend?”  I  asked  Priya.  “Yes,”  she  said,  “Me  and  Prabhud  have  been  in  a  relationship  for  more  than  a  year  now.  This  December  it  will  be  two  years.”  “Congratulations!”  I  said,  “I  haven’t  been  in  any  relationship  so  I  don’t  know  much  about  it.  How  is  it  like,  to  be  in  a  relationship?”  “It  has  its  ups  and  down.  Sometimes  you  wish  you  were  free  and  single  again,  but  you  know  that  once  you  are  free  and  single  again  you  will  again  want  to  be  in  a  relationship,  so  I  just  don’t  do  anything  about  it.”  “Oh,  that’s  true.  I  have  no  girlfriend  and  I  want  a  girlfriend,  and  when  I  will  have  one,  I  would  want  to  be  free  again.”  “Actually  it’s  really  nice  sometimes,  to  know  that  you  have  someone  who  loves  you  and  cares  for  you.  But  sometimes  it  gets  too  much.”  “What  gets  too  much?”  “As  for  example,  Prabhud  wants  me  to  be  there  for  him  all  the  time.  But  it’s  just  not  practically  possible.  I  wish  he  understood  that  I  can’t  be  there  for  him  all  the  time.  I  have  to  devote  time  for  studies.”  “What  do  you  want  to  become  when  you  grow  up?  Oh sorry!  We  are  already  grown  ups,  what do  you  want  to  do  once  MA  is  over?”  “I  am  actually  preparing  for  UPSC.  I  have  my  Prelims  coming  and  I  am  hardly  prepared  at  all.”  “Oh!  Then  you  have  to  work  real  hard. But  I  have  a  feeling  that  you  will  clear  it.”  She  smiled,  “Thanks”  she  said,  “What about  you?”  “I  want  to  be  a  writer.  I  want  to  write  novels  and  earn  my  bread  and  butter.”  “Nice,”  she  said,  “Good  luck  with  that”.  “Thanks”  I  said,  “You  are  really  nice.”  “You  too,”  she  said.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Remains of the Day

Confession of a Teenager

Teenage Dream