Mr. Indigo's Philosophy


Finding  himself  in  an  unexpected  journey  which  twisted  and  tossed  him  about  like  a  piece  of  paper  in  the  wind—the  details  of  which  can  be  summed  up  in  phrases  like  “travel-bag  stolen  in  the  train,”  “no  permanent  residence,”  “couch-sleeping  at  friends’  places,”  etc.  Mr.  Indigo  found  himself  formulating  a  new  outlook  towards  life.  He  borrowed  a  laptop  from  his  friend  Mr.  M.  Doley  and  wrote:

Living  to  the  fullest  is  to  “not”  know  how  the  next  day  would  be.  When  I  ponder  about  this  axiom  I  feel  there  is  truth  in  it  but  then  I  am  also  reminded  of  the  other  side  of  the  issue.  That  it  is  not  for  everyone  to  grasp  the  truth  of  the  meaning  of  the  axiom.  For  example,  a  person  who  grasps  the  philosophy  well  enough  would  know  that  there  is  nothing  to  know  what  the  next  day  would  be.  The  next  day—if  he  were  not  to  die—he  would  still  be  on  earth,  he  would  still  be  eating  something  to  keep  his  biological  metabolism  running,  he  would  still  have  hands  and  legs,  eyes  and  ears,  he  would  still  have  some  old  habits  of  mind  and  temperament.  And  most  importantly  he  would  still  have  that  something  which  is  beyond  the  realm  of  the  body  or  the  mind  but  has  to  do  with  his  inclination  of  the  spirit.  This  last,  the  spiritually  advanced  man  knows  to  be  permanent  and  knows  it  to  be  his  shining  beacon  of  light  wherever  he  went  or  whatever  he  transformed  into.  And  yet  he  will  not  be  able  to  foresee  in  detail  the  kind  of  day  he  is  going  to  have  in  the  next  day,  inside  him  will  be  an  element  of  expectancy  and  some  fear  to  every  new  day  that  comes  by.  He  even  himself  cannot  foresee  what  he  is  going  to  do,  every  day  is  new  to  him—he  does  not  know  whom  he  will  come  across  the  next  day,  the  kind  of  news  he  is  going  to  hear  or  sometimes  even  the  kind  of  food  he  is  going  to  eat  for  dinner.  In  short,  this  man  does  not  foreknow  the  details  of  his  day,  but  he  does  “know”  what  he  is,  the  stuff  he  is  made  of.  What  I  mean  by  the  latter  needs  to  be  explained.  He  does  know  what  he  is,  the  stuff  he  is  made  of,  it  means  that  he  knows  that  he  is  not  evolved  enough  to  go  about  eating  nothing,  and  most  importantly  he  knows—at  least  to  some  extent—what  he  is  here  to  do  on  earth,  and  that  knowledge  will  be  within  him  the  next  day  and  the  next  and  ad  infinitum.  Thus  for  the  wise  man,  life  is  one  big  adventure.  It  is  one  big  adventure  because  he  has  no  idea  what  new  characters  will  appear  in  his  life  the  next  day,  nor  has  he  any  idea  which  place  his  adventure  will  land  him  in.  He  only  knows  a  few  permanent  things  and  with  those  few  permanent  things  in  hand  he  moves  out  to  face  the  unknown.  I  realize  that  the  part  where  I  talk  about  new  characters  in  one’s  life  sounds  confusing,  and  so  does  the  new  place  he  will  land  in.  By  the  former  I  mean  literally  as  well  as  metaphorically.  Consider  this,  a  man  in  an  adventure,  say,  an  adventure  to  become  one  of  the  greatest  doctors  in  the  world,  or  the  greatest  architect,  he  is  bound  to  work  zealously  to  perfect  his  craft  and  on  this  quest  he  will  look  up  new  books,  and  seek  after  people  who  can  make  his  great  dream  come  true—whatever  the  case,  he  will  have  to  consult  or  interact  with  people—thus  even  if  he  does  not  literally  meet  new  characters  he  will  meet  them  in  his  mind,  he  will  see  them  in  their  actions.  He  will  feel  them  and  live  them  in  the  great  works  done  by  them.  And  he  will  meet  characters  in  his  memory  too,  a  strange  resurfacing  of  individual  events  and  people  of  his  past  who  will  aid  him  and  guide  him  in  his  quest.  The  latter  is  to  be  taken  in  a  similar  vein,  by  places  I  mean  the  places  he  will  have  to  visit  and  knock  doors  in  in  order  to  make  his  great  dream  come  true.  By  this  I  just  don’t  mean  knocking  at  literal  doors,  but  also  knocking  into  email  addresses  and  into  entrance  tests. 

Living  to  the  fullest  is  to  “not”  know  how  the  next  day  would  be.  When  I  ponder  about  this  axiom  I  feel  there  is  truth  in  it—and  I  tried  to  explain  this  truth  above—but  then  I  am  also  reminded  of  the  other  side  of  the  issue.

The  other  side  of  the  issue  is  that  it  is  not  for  everyone  to  grasp  the  meaning  of  the  axiom.  A  man  might  run  out  doing  crazy  stuff,  beating  people  up,  getting  drunk,  and  seducing  every  other  woman,  and  he  can  say  that  he  is  living  life  to  the  fullest,  that  he  has  no  idea  what  the  next  day  would  be  like.  This  man  does  not  realize  that  his  impulses  are  triggering  other  impulses  of  the  same  kind,  and  that  there  is  nothing  unpredictable  about  his  next  day.  He  is  a  creature  of  his  mental  habits  and  heading  towards  more  burden  and  bondage.  In  short,  his  life  is  not  an  adventure  that  fills  the  heart  with  joy.  He  has  no  eyes  to  appreciate  the  uncertainty  of  each  day  that  comes  to  his  life.  And  hence,  it  is  not  for  everyone  to  grasp  the  meaning  of  the  axiom.

But  after  the  labor  that  I  have  put  into  dissecting  the  axiom  I  consider  it  not  too  imprudent  to  hope,  and  if  I  may,  to  even  believe  that  the  dear  reader  will  not  misunderstand  me  when  I  say  that  “Living  to  the  fullest  is  to  “not”  know  how  the  next  day  would  be.”

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Remains of the Day

Confession of a Teenager

Teenage Dream